Chapter Secrets – Chapter 810

First of all I’d like to give an apology for the massive delay of today’s chapter. Please understand that I’m just a human teenager with life and stuff to do. Recently I’ve been incredibly busy, with traveling, working and many other things. I haven’t even been able to go watch Star Wars VII yet! School just issued an obligatory after-school activity on Friday, which won’t help at all too 😦 . This chapter wasn’t that full of secrets anyways, but just finding a few hours to make this couple pages wasn’t easy at all. I’m also much busier with other things in life so I don’t know how active I’ll be able to be in this forums but I’ll try my best to at least release chapter secrets each week. If one week I delay, even on several days, I hope you can be patient enough for it to come out 🙂

Next week it’s Christmas, so it will 100% surely delay, sorry for that

Anyways

“The day Jack left this country… was the day you defeated Doflamingo![IMG]

Not that much this week, but secrets are found nonetheless

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6 comments

  1. Hi there, I wanted to say thanks for your interesting site, which is quite in depth and informative and goes quite well alongside Gregs site on one-piece.com.
    Now I wanted to say something about the word Eisbahn:
    Firstly: it doesn’t stand for “ice” as you wrote since the german word “Eis” does not only mean the same thing, but is also pronounced exactly the same way, so it’s just coincidence.
    Secondly to the meaning of “Eisbahn”: literally it’s just ice track. But I think what Oda meant to do was use “Blitzeis” or flash ice: in early morning hours in winter it can happen that within minutes a thin layer of ice appears on roads. Since it happens really fast, it’s unexpected and a danger to cars ’cause it still is slippery and mostly unvisibly.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much ^^
      I know that Eisbahn means ice track, but since many of the translations already explained it, I didn’t want to be too redundant. I also messed up a bit with Eis, as I thought that it’s pronunciation with Ice was just a pun. Thanks for telling me 🙂

      Like

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